Tag Archive | value

Name Your Own Price Comes to the Peers of Beinan

Complete Series 3DThe Peers of Beinan Series is my epic medieval social science fiction series focusing on the adventures of Beinarian nobles and royals from the Gurun dynasty.  It is a six book series with a Legacy of Princess Anlei Trilogy edition and a Complete Series volume.  There’s also The Complete Data Files reference book and The Lost Tales companion book for a total of ten total book titles.

 

Effective the 12th of April 2015 all regular Peers of Beinan series books are now name your own price on Smashwords.  The two books that are staying regular price are the two you expect:  the Legacy of Princess Anlei Trilogy edition and The Complete Series volume because these contain multiple books at already low prices.

Returns 3D

Name your own price is only available on Smashwords; on all other retailers such as Amazon, Barnes/Noble, and iBookstore the books are all at their regular prices.

 

View and purchase the entire Peers of Beinan series on Smashwords at https://www.smashwords.com/books/byseries/2371.

No Excuses: One Star Reviews on Ebooks

permission to walk awayEvery author wants five star reviews.  This is a given.  As human beings we want everyone to love and adore our work, even when we know that is impossible.  Everyone has different tastes in books.  I like non-fiction history, you like a spicy romance.  You want to escape into another world; I want to better understand the one we are already in.  Different tastes make the world go round.

Indeed, critical reviews help authors by offering substance, feedback, and credibility.  No author with more than five or six reviews has a perfect five star average; someone will always find something imperfect about your work.  This is how it should be.  Your work should receive a mix of reviews.

With one exception:  the one star review.

Ghosts of the Past cover webOn books, there is absolutely no reason for a one star review.  Why?  Because all book retailers offer book SAMPLING — try it before you buy it.  The purpose is obvious:  if you like the sample, odds are really good you will like the book and buy it.  If you do not like the sample, odds are equally good that you will move on and not bother to purchase the book.  Sampling helps match books with readers who like and appreciate them so that there is SOMETHING the reader likes before purchase.

If you like a book before you buy it, odds are good you will still like something about the book after you read it.  Yes, there are plenty of examples of books not living up to their promise by the end — those are the ones who receive two star and three star reviews.  But a one star review is different:  it means there is no redeeming quality to the book.  If this is the case, why did the reader download it after reading the sample in the first place?

To this, only one logical answer resonates:  the person did not read the sample before download.  Why not?  In my experience this happens with free books.  A person who pays nothing for a book risks nothing by downloading it (this is often why authors often their books for free).  The flip side to this is that the person who pays nothing invests nothing in the same book; there’s no value to it because no money is actually paid.

When we pay money for something, we value it.  It matters to us.  We are careful about our choices.  We make sure before we buy something that it is something we (or any person we give it to) really want and expect to enjoy.  The more something costs us, the more careful we are to evaluate whether or not we really want it in the first place.  With books, we take our time and read the samples.  We research.  We investigate.  Then and only then do we spend the money and buy.

Every single one star review I ever received came from people who received my book as a gift in some way — a winner in a giveaway, a special sale promotion, or a permafree book.  In paying nothing, the reader invested nothing.  By investing nothing the reader had no inhibitions about trashing my book and hurting its review average with that one star.

That is, if s/he read it at all; I have reviews where it is clear all the person did was skim the sample, then write the review based on a few paragraphs and feign to have read the entire thing.  These too were negative reviews whose content did not match with anything mentioned in reviews written by those who read the books.

Why do people do this?  Give me your thoughts!  Let’s talk about our experiences dealing with negative reviews!  Post your comment here or tweet to https://twitter.com/laurelworlds.

Olive Garden’s Principato Wines Among the Best of the House Wines

May 11th, 2012

 

The Olive Garden is one of the best known chain restaurants for Italian food. Certainly the television advertisements make the food look spectacular. Indeed, I have always found the food at Olive Garden quite good.

One of the best items on the Olive Garden menu is not a food item at all-but their house wines, Principato. Offered as bianco (white), rosato (blush), and rosso (red), Principato wines are perhaps the best reason to dine at Olive Garden. Principato are offered at the reasonable prices of $5.75 for a 6 oz glass, $8.25 for a 9 oz quartino (served in a sake carafe), and $28.00 for an entire bottle .

By the ounce, a $28 bottle costs $1.10407 per ounce. By the 6 oz glass, you pay $0.958333 per ounce. But the best value is the quartino which costs just $0.91666 per ounce.

But saving money is not the best reason for you to order Principato when you dine at the Olive Garden. These are genuinely very high quality wines-which the servers allow you to sample before you commit to ordering. That service is above and beyond anything I have seen at any other restaurant. Principato wines are also milder than a lot of their counterparts, making them palatable to people who generally do not drink wine. The red lacks the overwhelming tannins I find with most cabernet sauvignon and merlot wines; it’s lighter and a little sweeter without going all the way to a semi-sweet. The white is also milder than your typical sauvignon blanc or chardonnay which I find can be a little overbearing at times, making the bianco very palatable. But it is the rosato, the blush that is the best of all of these. Light, fruity, and a little sweeter than your typical white wine, it is a wine for both those who are connoisseurs and those who typically do not like to drink wine. It is the perfect complement to pasta and seafood in particular, bringing out the delicate sauces and cheese better than any other wine I’ve consumed with either pasta or seafood.

Principato is not only a good value-it’s a truly great wine, worth dining at the Olive Garden for.

Mid-night musing: I watch in horror at human complacency

America Poverty CoverI watch in horror the way that human life and human creativity‬ are regarded as worthless. Not since just before the black death swept the world in the 13th to 17th centuries have we seen such a poor regard for life, for human dignity. Books that take years to write are sold for pennies. Music that take 10,000 hours to craft are not even acknowledged as worth paying for. We have an epidemic of complacency, where no one relates to anyone, where everyone takes everything for granted. There is no more thanksgiving to our cultures. There is no more any sort of appreciation for the hardship of others. We are all calloused. We simply no longer care. We want to each live, but few around us respect who we are nor that we should continue to live.

In Star Wars episode I, Anakin Skywalker said, “The problem with this universe is that no one helps anyone.” He was right.

Instead of treating everyone else as “surplus population” we need to understand that there is abundance all around us. We only need to come together, to care about each other, to help one another instead of judging people to find it.

When I was a child, we did a little play called “stone soup” about a traveler who tricks a community full of people only concerned for themselves into working together as a community, of sharing what they had with those around them.

We need some stone soup. We need to care about each other once more.

Summer Coffee Experiment: Iced Coffee Without the Coffee Maker

It’s hot — too hot for hot coffee.  This is one of my favorite food posts to Yahoo Voices made on August 6th, 2013.

 

Summer Coffee Experiment: Iced Coffee Without the Coffee Maker

Beating the Heat with a Surprising Alternative to Brewed Coffee

 It’s hot out there! If you are like me, and odds are you are, the idea of drinking hot anything just doesn’t have the same appeal as it does in October. So what is a coffee lover supposed to do?Drink iced of course!But iced coffee still has to be brewed — or does it?

This summer I’ve conducted a special coffee experiment: put away the coffee maker and make iced coffee entirely using INSTANT coffee.

Did I just say INSTANT? Yes. I realize this is heresy in the coffee world, but yes! At least on a trial basis, an experiment designed to see if I can avoid heating my apartment, even for several minutes, by way of the coffee maker.

Being picky about coffee, just ANY instant coffee will not do. For the experiment, I bought a three ounce canister of Folgers classic roast crystals. I also opened up a bottle of my favorite flavored creamer –Baileys lately.

Here’s the approximate recipe I’ve used this summer so far:

one to two ounces Baileys creamer
1 to 1/2 tsp instant Folgers classic roast coffee crystals
eight to ten ounces whole milk.

Put each of these in order in a standard 12 ounce glass. Stir vigorously. If the day is especially hot, add one or two ice cubes.

I usually then let the coffee sit for a couple minutes to give any unmixed coffee the chance to saturate — then drink it. No sugar required (and I love my coffee sweet) unless I choose to omit the creamer that day — which tastes just as good with a little sugar added to compensate.

The end product is essentially an iced cafe au lait or iced coffee Americano at least as good as any iced coffee I’ve bought at Starbucks. Cost: about fifty cents per glass, depending on the brand of creamer you use with the milk.

After drinking my coffee this way for the last seven weeks, I’m sold; I just bought another canister of instant Folgers to cover the rest of the summer.

As picky as I am about coffee and food in general, this passes my test. Try it yourself!