Tag Archive | UK

UK Holiday: UK rules for personal foodstuffs less strict than USA rules

The count down is on for my flight and the excitement is building.  I am making my food shopping list, checking it twice, and going to find out who is naughty and nice! (Couldn’t help the pun).

jerky

You can’t bring the beef jerky into the UK nor bring UK origin beef jerky into the USA. The trail mix is fine going into the UK, but must be declared at customs returning to the USA.

Time to really look at government websites and see what is and is not allowed.  Fortunately my post from yesterday seems to be spot-on with regards to what you can bring into the United Kingdom from outside of Europe.  As specified on gov.uk, the main restrictions relate to meat and dairy.  If you go through the page, HM government is very detailed and very explicit on the matter — which is good because no one wants problems at customs.  You can consume meat and dairy to your heart’s content on your flight from USA to UK — at long as you throw away the leftovers before you land.

The USA is apparently much more strict about food coming home from another country.  Looking at the US Customs and Border Protection site and their FAQ for travelers you cannot bring ANY fresh food of any type into the United States.  Anything you do bring with you (aka you didn’t throw away before you disembark from your plane into the USA) must be declared OR YOU FACE a $10,000 FINE.

$10,000 for not saying “I have some crackers in my bag.”

apricots

These apricots are allowed into the UK without any issues. But if I don’t eat them while on holiday and try to bring them back into the USA, I must declare them at customs — or face a $10,000 fine!

Absolutely NO fresh food is allowed into the USA at all.  According to the FAQ, most dried fruits and nuts ARE allowed — as long as you declare them.  Likewise, as long as you tell them, it’s not an issue if you save your pretzels from your flight to eat while you are waiting to change planes.

But it is a bit telling.  I really never expected the flight back to the USA to be more risky than the flight to the United Kingdom.

Well, maybe this is just the universe’s way of telling me something I already know about myself — and where I am happiest!

Repost: Voice may reveal who has clout

Yesterday I blogged a link to Richard Mann’s Radio Reflections which he not only presented, but produced as well.  So it seems fitting that today I should repost a report on some fascinating research, much of it done in the UK, on how our voices reflect social status and power — and perhaps why Margaret Thatcher was able to lead so effectively.

 

Voice May Reveal Who Has Clout
Be­ing in a po­si­tion of pow­er can change the sound of your voice, and lis­ten­ers of­ten pick up on that to fig­ure out who is really in charge, new re­search finds.

We tend to fo­cus on our words when we want to come across as pow­erful, but the find­ings sug­gest acous­tic cues are al­so im­por­tant. Mark­ers of more pow­erful po­si­tion, for ex­am­ple, may in­clude a higher and louder voice.

“Whether it’s par­ents at­tempt­ing to as­sert au­thor­ity over un­ruly chil­dren, hag­gling be­tween a car sales­man and cus­tom­er, or ne­gotia­t­ions be­tween heads of states, the sound of the voices in­volved may pro­foundly de­ter­mine the out­come of those in­ter­ac­tions,” said lead re­searcher Sei Jin Ko of San Die­go State Uni­vers­ity in Ca­li­for­nia.

It was form­er U.K. prime min­is­ter Mar­ga­ret That­cher who in­spired the re­search. “It was quite well known that That­cher had gone through ex­ten­sive voice coach­ing to ex­ude a more au­thoritative, pow­erful per­sona,” ex­plained Ko. “We wanted to ex­plore how some­thing so fun­da­men­tal as pow­er might elic­it changes in the way a voice sounds, and how these situa­t­ional vo­cal changes im­pact the way lis­ten­ers per­ceive and be­have to­ward the speak­ers.”

Ko, along with Mel­o­dy Sadler of San Die­go State and Ad­am Galin­sky of Co­lum­bia Busi­ness School, de­signed two stud­ies to find out. The findings were pub­lished Nov. 20 online in the jour­nal Psy­cho­log­i­cal Sci­ence.

In a first ex­pe­ri­ment, the investigators recorded 161 col­lege stu­dents read­ing a pas­sage aloud; this first re­cord­ing cap­tured their voice be­fore any par­tic­u­lar high-or-low pow­er sta­tus was ev­i­dent. The par­ti­ci­pants were then ran­domly as­signed a high- or low-sta­tus role in a ne­gotia­t­ion game.

Stu­dents as­signed to a “high” rank were told to go in­to the ne­gotia­t­ion im­ag­in­ing that they ei­ther had a strong al­ter­na­tive of­fer, val­u­a­ble in­side in­forma­t­ion, or high sta­tus in the work­place, or they were asked to re­call an ex­perience in which they had pow­er be­fore the ne­gotia­t­ion started. Low-rank stu­dents, on the oth­er hand, were told to im­ag­ine they had ei­ther a weak of­fer, no in­side in­forma­t­ion, or low work­place sta­tus, or they were asked to re­call an ex­perience in which they lacked pow­er.

The stu­dents then read a sec­ond pas­sage aloud, as if they were lead­ing off ne­gotia­t­ions with their im­ag­i­nary ad­ver­sary, and their voices were recorded. Eve­ry­one read the same open­ing, al­low­ing the re­search­ers to ex­am­ine acous­tics while hold­ing the speech con­tent the same.

The re­search­ers found that the voices of stu­dents as­signed to high-pow­er roles tended to go up in pitch, be­come less var­i­a­ble in pitch, and be­come more var­i­a­ble in loud­ness than the oth­ers’ voices.

“A­maz­ingly, pow­er af­fect­ed our par­ti­ci­pants’ voices in al­most the ex­act same way that That­cher’s voice changed af­ter her vo­cal train­ing,” said Galin­sky.

And the stu­dents’ vo­cal cues did­n’t go un­no­ticed. A sec­ond ex­pe­ri­ment with a sep­a­rate group of col­lege stu­dents re­vealed that lis­ten­ers, who had no knowl­edge of the first ex­pe­ri­ment, were able to pick up on these pow­er-related vo­cal cues to de­ter­mine who did and did not have pow­er: Lis­ten­ers ranked speak­ers who had been as­signed to the high-rank group as more likely to en­gage in high-pow­er be­hav­iors, and they were able to cat­e­go­rize wheth­er a speak­er had high or low rank with con sidera­ble ac­cu­ra­cy.

In line with the vo­cal changes ob­served in the first ex­pe­ri­ments, lis­ten­ers tended to as­so­ci­ate high­er pitch and voices that var­ied in loud­ness with high-pow­er be­hav­iors. They al­so as­so­ci­ated louder voices with high­er pow­er.

“These find­ings sug­gest that lis­ten­ers are quite per­cep­tive to these sub­tle varia­t­ions in vo­cal cues and they use these cues to de­cide who is in charge,” said Galin­sky.

 

 

Repost: 17 Differences Between Rich and Poor

923544_522633857793764_2029061548_nMy interest in the Law of Attraction means I inevitably receive a lot of email, most of it designed to sell something to me — a seminar, a video, a book.  I am sure you are not alone.  Email lists are wonderful — except for the way so many of them inevitably are designed to sell you something.  It is one reason, actually, why I defy conventional wisdom and do NOT set up mailing lists of fans or potential fans for my books.  I hate junk email and I’m sure you do too!

 

This morning I received an email that was clearly designed to sell me a book or something focusing on what rich people do that poor people do not do.  I have no interest in buying whatever they are selling.  But sprinkled among the standard “buy this” fare, the email did contain some useful information, information I am republishing here.

Stripping away the stuff we don’t want, here is the useful things from that email with just ONE “buy my book” link retained as a form of citation:

——————————————

The process of manifestation states that thoughts lead to feelings, feelings lead to actions, and actions lead to results. Everything in your life begins with your thoughts and your thoughts are generated from your mind.
Therefore it is vital to know how to program your mind so the thoughts you think are supportive thoughts which help you to achieve your financial goals.
The universal truth is that we become what we think about. Buddha also said “All that we are is the result of what we have thought. The mind is everything. What we think we become”. It’s an obvious fact that if you want to be someone you have to think like that person.
Thinking British is the surest way to become British.

Thinking British is the surest way to become British.

For example if you want to be an engineer, you have to think like an engineer. If you want to be rich, you have to think like the rich. Fortunately the way of thinking can be learnt and practised.
The following are the 17 wealth files which can be found in “Secrets of the Millionaire Mind” book.
Wealth File #1:
Rich people believe “I create my life.”
Poor people believe “Life happens to me.”
Wealth File #2:
Rich people play the money game to win.
Poor people play the money game to not lose.
Wealth File #3:
Rich people are committed to being rich.
Poor people want to be rich.

new-york-times-best-selling-author3

To become a New York Times Best Selling Author, one has to think like one.

Wealth File #4:
Rich people think big.
Poor people think small.

Wealth File #5:
Rich people focus on opportunities.
Poor people focus on obstacles.

Wealth File #6:
Rich people admire other rich and successful people.
Poor people resent rich and successful people.

Wealth File #7:
Rich people associate with positive, successful people.
Poor people associate with negative or unsuccessful people.

Wealth File #8:
Rich people are willing to promote themselves and their value.
Poor people think negatively about selling and promotion.

Be bigger than your problems.  Immigration to the United Kingdom is only as difficult as I believe it to be.

Be bigger than your problems. Immigration to the United Kingdom is only as difficult as I believe it to be.

Wealth File #9:
Rich people are bigger than their problems.
Poor people are smaller than their problems.

Wealth File #10:
Rich people are excellent receivers.
Poor people are poor receivers.

Wealth File #11:

Rich people choose to get paid based on results.
Poor people choose to get paid based on time.

Wealth File #12:
Rich people think “both.”
Poor people think “either/or.”

 

gbp-50-british-pounds-2Wealth File #13:
Rich people focus on their net worth.
Poor people focus on their working income.

Wealth File #14:
Rich people manage their money well.
Poor people mismanage their money well.

Wealth File #15:
Rich people have their money work hard for them.
Poor people work hard for their money.

Wealth File #16:
Rich people act in spite of fear.
Poor people let fear stop them.

Wealth File #17:
Rich people constantly learn and grow.
Poor people think they already know.

Reblog: Why I’m “Lost”

Cover art for Laurel A. Rockefeller's "The Lost Tales" from the Anlei's Legacy Trilogy.

Cover art for Laurel A. Rockefeller’s “The Lost Tales” from the Anlei’s Legacy Trilogy.

Good afternoon everyone.  Today UK-based Back Cover Promotions launched their new magazine, “Creative Dreams.”  I am pleased to write the very first feature post for Creative Dreams entitled, “Why I’m Lost.” http://ow.ly/u43yl.

The article discusses why I chose to put out a “Lost Tales” anthology, tips for successful world-building, and the writing process. If you aspire to a career in writing, I hope you will please read this inaugural post and through it, improve your own writing craft.

Have a lovely day and a great upcoming weekend!