Tag Archive | Shakespeare

Early Fifteenth Century Costuming: General Guidelines for “Catherine de Valois: A Play in Three Acts”

 

Isabeau of Bavaria

Queen Isabeau of Bavaria in her royal houppeland.

As a historian, history is my passion.  I love few things better than seeing a period-correct drama where the costumes are accurately rendered.  But what do you do if your budget is small or you are playing scenes from “Catherine de Valois: A Play in Three Acts” or Shakespeare’s “Henry V?” What if you don’t have years of expertise researching medieval gowns?

The following is a general guide for productions of “Catherine de Valois: A Play in Three Acts” and for general re-enactment of  early 15th century characters/personae:

WOMEN:  A cotehardie.  Over her cotehardie she wears either a side-less surcoat or a floor length houppelande. In adults, hair is typically kept up and under a veil or period headpiece.  Wimples are sometimes worn under the chin.

MEN:  Knee length doublets over a white shirt. Over this men also sometimes wore houppelandes cover the upper body.  Hose covers lower body in all cases.  Indoors men wear simple leather shoes or ankle-length boots. Men wear hats.  Outdoors men wear knee length boots.

Additional examples of cotehardies,  houppelands, and hairstyles can be found across my many pinterest boards.

cotehardie-with-sideless-surcoat

Cotehardie with sideless surcoat.  Note that cotehardies may be either back laced (as in this example) or side-laced.

Special costuming for “Catherine de Valois: A Play in Three Acts”and for general reenactment of early 15th century characters/personae

PROLOGUE/EPILOGUE: Margaret wears a wedding veil on her head which is secured by a wreath of flowers.

Act I, Scene VII: Queen Isabeau is richly dressed in a velvet houppelande.  Catherine wears a white cotehardie.  Fleur-de-lys adorn Catherine’s royal blue velvet side-less surcoat.  Mother and daughter are dressed to impress as they wait to meet King Henry of England.

Act I, Scene VIII: Catherine wears a Christmas green houppelande.  In her hair she wears a circlet of holly and berries.  Queen Isabeau wears exactly the same dress as she wears in act one, scene two.

Act II, Scene II: The duke’s clothes are noble, but showing some wear.

Act II, Scene III: Catherine wears a loose houppelande to cover her slightly pregnant belly.

Act III, Scenes I, II: Catherine wears a bright white gown, veil, and wimple in accord with medieval mourning customs.

Act III, Scene III: Catherine wears the white cotehardie and blue side-less surcoat that she wore in

Act I, Scene VII. On her head is the crown given to her at her coronation as queen of England.

History Profile: King Henry V of England

330px-King_Henry_V_from_NPGDate of Birth: 16 September 1386 at Monmouth Castle, Monmouthshire, Wales.

Date of Death: 31 August 1422 — dysentery contracted while on campaign near Paris, France.

Spouse:  Queen Catherine de Valois (married 6 June 1420)

Issue: King Henry VI of England — House Lancaster

King Henry V of England is one of the most celebrated of English monarchs.  Immortalized by Shakespeare in “Henry V,” the myth created by the play conceals the real person whose short life was characterized by bloody warfare, a ferocious temper, and vindictive violence.

King Henry was thirteen years old when his father, Henry Bolingbroke successfully wrestled the throne of England away from his cousin King Richard II to become King Henry IV.  Very soon after his father’s coronation, Owain Glyndŵr declared himself Prince of Wales and commenced one of the most successful wars of independence against English colonization in Welsh history.

Schlacht_von_Azincourt

The Battle of Agincourt. 26 October 1415.

Not surprisingly, King Henry IV sent Prince Henry to Wales to crush the Glyndŵr revolt, suffering personal injury when a Welsh arrow struck him in the face.  Prince Henry responded with brutal vengeance in a pattern seen throughout his life, especially in his campaigns in France while king.  King Henry V did not believe taking prisoners of war; those who surrendered after a defeat could expect to be executed. Henry believed that any person who challenged his authority, even when forced into military service against him, was a threat to his life and his crown. This included the women and children living in the towns and cities Henry laid siege to.  It was a bloody reign.

Learn more about King Henry V through the eyes of his relationship with his queen consort in “Catherine de Valois.”  Available in digital, paperback, and audio editions.

Owen and Catherine: the Love Story that launched the Tudor dynasty

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Just then a scream echoed in the forest.  Drawing their swords, Linet and Boudicca charged towards the sound.  By the time they reached the source all that could be seen was Prasutagus, his blood spilling into the ground – as if a year-king killed as an offering to the gods for his people.  Prasutagus looked up, his eyes blurring, “Boudicca?”

Boudicca knelt, weeping, the blood from his chest wound soaking her dress, “I am here.”

“A Roman – scout – I – surprised him.” gasped Prasutagus, trying in vain to tell his wife what happened, knowing the moment he died rage would fill her – rage against Rome.

Boudicca kissed him tenderly, “My love, do not leave me!”  Prasutagus kissed her repeatedly, his eyes fixed on hers until they saw no more.  Feeling his spirit leave his body, Boudicca wept, as if her entire life suddenly passed with him – at least for this moment.  Finally, she rose, helping Linet carry him to their chariot.  With a gentle nudge of the reigns the horses turned for home and the sad work ahead.

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Welcome to RomanceFest 2015!  I hope all month long you’ll discover many amazing books from some of the top independent authors in the world.

Complete Series 3D

My contribution to RomanceFest is a bit different.  Rather than offering you the thrilling paranormal science fiction romance of the Peers of Beinan Series, I decided to take a different, much more risky approach.  I decided to make my RomanceFest books CREATIVE NON-FICTION HISTORY for young readers and family audiences.

In the excerpt you just read above and audio excerpt you just heard on the youtube video, you experienced the powerful love between King Prasugasus of the Iceni and his wife, Queen Boudicca.  Boudicca is remembered every year in King’s Cross London for destroying the Roman cities of Camulodunum (originally the capital of the Trinovantes, the southern neighbour to the Iceni in what is now Essex), Londonium, and Saint Albans in the year 61 CE.  Typically she is portrayed as a vengeful shrew getting back at the Romans for publicly flogging her and raping her two daughters (aged 10-12 years old).  I took a different approach with the biography, one intensely grounded in archaeology and one taking a broader look at the cultures of ancient Britain.  Boudicca:  Britain’s Queen of the Iceni is creative non-fiction history for young readers and families at its absolute finest, one benefiting immensely from the dynamic artistry of British voice artist and actor Richard Mann (easily the best English actor you probably never heard of — yet!).

Now I would like to introduce you to Queen Catherine de Valois.  Shakespeare immortalized Catherine in “Henry V,” a play very much taking King Henry’s point of view.  The real Henry and the real Catherine were very different.  In my biography for younger readers and families, you meet the real Catherine de Valois: bright, educated, and religiously devout.  You see her in her historical context as she navigates her father’s mental illness, the French civil war between house Valois and the Duchy of Burgundy, and her brother Charles’ struggles to become king of France — with a little help from Joan of Arc.

But more importantly, you explore her relationships with King Henry V of England, their son King Henry VI, and the true love she found in Owen Tudor.  It is a beautiful, romantic tale to inspire generations of girls and women.

I am pleased to announce that in May or June 2015 Richard Mann and I will release the audio edition of Catherine de Valois on Audible, Amazon, and iTunes.  So take a listen to the above audio book excerpt, then download your copy of Catherine de Valois on Amazon.com, Barnes/Noble, Smashwords, or Ibookstore.

 

Enter to win a free copy of Catherine de Valois! Winners announced 31st of May 2015