Tag Archive | recipe

Recipe: Ice Cream Cone Cupcakes

The following recipe is reposted from https://www.pgeveryday.com/home/cooking-recipes/article/birthday-ice-cream-cone-cupcakes.

ice-cream-cone-cupcakes-1-size-3

Ingredients (serves 8 people)
1 box cake mix
¼ cup oil (follow amount listed on cake mix instructions)
1 cup water (follow amount listed on cake mix instructions)
3 eggs (follow amount listed on cake mix instructions)
1 package flat-bottomed ice cream cones
1 container frosting
Sprinkles or other toppings as desired

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 F
  2. Prepare cake mix according to package instructions
  3. Transfer batter into a container with a pour spout. Pour batter into ice cream cones, filling each 2/3 of the way full
  4. Place cones on a cookie sheet and bake for 18–20 minutes, or until an inserted toothpick comes out clean. Let cool
  5. Frost and decorate with your choice of toppings

 

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Recipe: Beinarian Slatkos with Kara, Kelan, or Nanla Filling

Created for The Great Succession Crisis and appearing in the 2nd Edition  (recipe was deleted for the Third Edition; both editions are available in paperback), slatkos are a fusion of breakfast pastry with Italian cannolis and filled with approximations of Beinarian kara, kelan, or nanli fruits.

slatkos

Beinarian Slatkos with Kara, Kelan, or Nanla Filling

Created by Laurel A. Rockefeller; Kristeen Shuga and Alayna Hoglund of “What’s the Occasion” bakery.

 

Beinarian slatkos are buttery baked pastry filled with fruit fillings popular across Beinan at formal events and sometimes for breakfast.  Slatkos made be filled with any number of fruits and/or nuts from across the planet.  While kara, kelan, nanla, and other Beinarian trees cannot grow here, their flavors can be closely replicated as demonstrated in this easy recipe.  It works best when stainless steel cannoli forms are put in the middle while baking; without the forms, each slatko bakes completely flat, greatly reducing the amount of filling and requiring the scooping out of some of the bread in the middle.

 

Pastry Puff Shells

1 cup all-purpose flour

½ teaspoon salt

½ cup cold butter, divided

¼ cup ice water

1 ½ teaspoons water

2 tablespoons beaten egg

 

  1. In a small bowl, combine flour and salt; cut in ¼ cup butter until crumbly. Gradually add water, tossing with a fork until a ball forms. On a lightly floured surface, roll dough into a 12 inch x 6 inch rectangle.

 

  1. Cut remaining butter into thin slices. Starting at a short side of dough, arrange half of the thin butter slices over two-thirds of rectangle to within ½ inch of edges. Fold unbuttered third of dough over middle third. Fold remaining third over the middle, forming a 6 inch x 4 inch rectangle. Roll dough into a 12 inch x 6 inch rectangle.

 

  1. Repeat steps of butter layering and dough folding until all the butter is incorporated into the dough, ending with a 6 inch x 4 inch rectangle. Wrap in plastic wrap; refrigerate for 15 minutes. Roll dough into a 12 inch x 6 inch rectangle once more. Fold in half lengthwise and then width-wise. Wrap in plastic wrap; refrigerate for 1 hour.

 

  1. In a small bowl, combine egg and water. Roll dough into a 12 inch square; cut into four squares. Brush with half of the egg mixture. Place squares onto cookie sheet and grab the two opposite corners and connect them over a stainless steel cannoli form.

 

  1. Bake at 450° for 10-15 minutes or until golden brown. Cool until warm but not burning hot. Gently slide cannoli form out.  Cool completely.  Fill as directed below.

Substitution: baked shell dough may be substituted with crescent roll or turnover dough located in your local grocery store. Of the “crescent” dough options available in the supermarket, we prefer the new Pillsbury Crescent Recipe Creations Seamless Dough Sheet which is uncut crescent bread dough. To use pre-purchased dough, simply unroll, separate (or cut to size if using the dough sheet), bring the corners together over each cannoli form, seal, bake, and fill.  For the flakiest shells, use turnover dough or Grands biscuit dough rolled/pressed out to size.

 

Fillings:

1 ½ cups berries or chopped fruit

¼ cup sugar (if the fruit is tart or slightly unripe)

3 tablespoons cornstarch diluted in enough COLD water to dissolve it.

 

  1. Puree with blender or mash thoroughly to a smooth to slightly lumpy consistency. Push through a sieve if you want to remove the seeds. Put puree in a pot on medium heat on the stovetop; add sugar and starch liquid; stir constantly. Bring to a boil until well thickened. Cool completely. This will become very thick and tastes very fresh.

 

  1. Once cooled, place some filling into either pastry bag or a sandwich bag. Cut hole into bag and squeeze slightly into pastry to pipe in the filling. Alternatively, a small spoon can be used to carefully fill each slatko shell. It is easier if you fill half on one side and half on the other as well.

 

Beinarian fillings:

 

Kara fruit filling

¾ cup blackberries (approximately 1 6 oz. container)

¾ cup blueberries (just under ½ of a standard pint container)

 

Kelan fruit filling

¾ cup blackberries (approximately 1 6 oz. container)

¾ cup lingonberries (approximately ¼ to ⅓ pound)

 

Nanla fruit filling

1 medium apple, peeled, cored, and chopped into small but not fine chunks

¾ cup kiwi fruit (about 1 to 2 fruit, depending on size), peeled and chopped

 

Nanla fruit filling should be coarser than most slatko fillings; do not puree completely smooth.

 

Toppings:

 

After baking and filling, the tubes may be doused with powdered sugar, sprinkles, iced at the ends, or just left plain.

Repost: Beer and Cheese Pasta Sauce

When I was studying at the University of Nebraska there was one IT restaurant in town that was so popular you usually had to wait a very long time to get in.  It was called Spaghetti Works and it seriously had the best pasta and best pasta sauces I’ve ever tasted in my life — and an all you can eat salad bar with most meals that made sure you were getting a very healthy lunch or dinner.

In recent years Spaghetti Works fell out of favour in Lincoln (though on my last and final visit to Nebraska the one in the Old Market of Omaha was still going strong) and the Lincoln location closed.  But its “beer and cheese” pasta sauce is/was still to die for.

I am so happy then to find a recipe for it and am sharing it now with you. Bon Appetit!

beer-cheese-sauce

Spaghetti Works Beer Cheese Pasta Sauce

8 oz. jar Cheez Whiz (I know- Cheez Whiz… but it worked well)
8 oz. Whole Milk (now’s not the time to be thinking low fat or skim)
8 oz. flat beer (I used a decent pale ale but you probably don’t want anything too hoppy or too strongly flavored also it was not flat but that only contributed a little bit of extra foaming which subsided)
8 oz. Beef Broth
5 Tbs flour
5 Tbs butter
Optional-Real bacon bits or crisp crumbled bacon

Heat Cheez Whiz, milk, beer, & beef broth to 140 degs. stirring constantly.
Melt butter in sauce pan & add flour, stir until blended, cook 2 minutes but do not brown.
Stir the roux into the the cheese mixture and heat to 160 degs. stirring constantly.
Remove from heat & add bacon bits if desired.
Serve over spaghetti or favorite pasta.

Repost: Czech Kolaches Recipe

kolaches dorothy kusakI grew up with Czech Kolaches.  Very popular across the midwest United States they are probably the best reason to travel to Nebraska, Iowa, Kansas, and other midwestern states.

Of course I haven’t been able to find them anywhere else.  So I was thrilled to find this recipe on facebook courtesy Dorothy Husak.

Czech Kolaches.
Recipe makes 56
Ingredients
2 cups whole milk
3/4 cup butter, cut up
3/4 cup shortening, cut up
1/2 cup sugar
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 eggs, lightly beaten
6 cups all-purpose flour
2 packages active dry yeast envelopes
Desired filling (see below)
Powdered Sugar Icing (see below)

Directions

In a large saucepan, heat and stir milk, butter, shortening, sugar and salt just until warm (120 degreesF to 130 degrees F) and butter and shortening almost melt. Set aside and cool for 5 minutes. Stir in eggs.
In a large mixing bowl, combine 3 cups of the flour and the yeast. Add milk mixture. Beat with an electric mixer on low speed for 30 seconds or until combined. Beat on high speed for 3 minutes. Gradually add remaining flour, switching to a wooden spoon if necessary to stir in last amount of flour. (Dough will be very soft.) Cover bowl with plastic wrap and chill overnight.
Shape chilled dough into 1 1/2-inch balls. Place 2 inches apart on baking sheets lined with parchment paper. Cover; let rise in a warm place 30 minutes. Use your thumb or the back of a round measuring teaspoon to make a deep indentation in center of a few balls at a time. Spoon about 1 teaspoon filling into each indentation. Repeat with remaining balls and filling.
Bake one or two pans of kolaches at a time at 325 degrees for 12 to 15 minutes or until lightly golden on the bottoms. Immediately remove to racks; cool slightly. If you like, drizzle with icing before serving.

 

Poppy Seed Filling: In a coffee grinder or small food processor blend 3/4 cup (4 ounces) poppy seeds until fine. Set aside. In a small saucepan combine 1/2 cup milk, 1/3 cup sugar, 2 tablespoons butter, 1 tablespoon honey and a dash of salt. Cook and stir over medium heat until butter is melted. Remove from heat. In a small bowl, lightly beat 2 egg yolks. Gradually stir about half of the warm milk mixture into beaten yolks. Return the yolk mixture to milk mixture in saucepan and stir to combine. Cook and stir over medium heat just until mixture thickens and coats a spoon. Remove from heat. Stir in poppy seeds and 1/2 teaspoon lemon zest. Transfer to a bowl and chill, covered, for at least 2 hours or up to 2 days. Makes 1 1/2 cups.
Raspberry Filling: In a medium saucepan, combine 2 cups frozen raspberries, 3/4 cup sugar, 2 tablespoons water, 1 tablespoon cornstarch and 1 teaspoon lemon juice. Cook and stir over medium heat until thickened and bubbly. Cook and stir for 2 minutes more. Transfer to a bowl and chill, covered, for at least 2 hours or up to 2 days. Makes 1 1/2 cups.
Apricot Filling: In a medium saucepan, combine 1 1/2 cups chopped dried apricots and 1 1/2 cups apricot nectar. Cook and stir over medium-high heat until boiling. Reduce heat and simmer, covered, for 15 minutes. Remove from heat and stir in 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon. Cool slightly. Place in a blender and blend until smooth. (Mixture should be thicker than applesauce.) Transfer to a bowl and chill, covered, for several hours or up to 2 days. Makes 1 1/2 cup.
Powdered Sugar Icing: In a small bowl, combine 2 cups powdered sugar, 2 tablespoons milk and 1/2 teaspoon vanilla. Stir in additional milk, 1 teaspoon at a time, until icing reaches drizzling consistency. Makes 2/3 cup.
storage

Store unglazed kolaches in an airtight container at room temperature for up to 2 days, or freeze for up to 3 months.

Chamomile and English Lavender Iced Tea

Chamomile and English Lavender Iced Tea

Winning Recipe from the Barony of St. Swithin’s Bog (SCA) Tea Brewing Competition at 2012 “Spring Thing”

July 15th, 2013

 

Recipe Used for tea brewing competition at the Barony of St. Swithin’s Bog (Aethelmearc) 2012 “Spring Thing” event:

2 TBSP loose chamomile

1 ½ tsp English (culinary) Lavender

¾ cup granulated sugar

4 trays ice

1 quart cold water

Follow manufacturer instructions or your favorite method for brewing

Makes 1 quart

Medieval Period usage:

Chamomile and lavender were both well known medicinal herbs in period. In her paper, “Medieval Use of Herbs” Mistress Jadwiga Zajaczkowa outlines and documents how dozens of herbs, including lavender and chamomile, were used in period.

Chamomile, Matricaria chamomilla: a short, creeping fringy plant with daisylike flowers. Used in handwashing waters and for headaches. Lawns and garden seats were planted with chamomile, for it ‘smells the sweeter for being trodden on’. Scientific testing indicates that it really may help settle the stomach and soothe the nerves, which may be why it was used in fevers.”

“LavenderLavendula vera, Lavendula spica, Lavendula stoechas: dried purple flowers. Used in food, and in refreshing washes for headaches; a cap with lavender flowers quilted in it kept headaches at bay. Used extensively in baths, as a personal scent and as a moth repellent.”

Chocolate and Vanilla Egg Crèmes: Brooklyn’s Best Kept Secret

One of the most enduring parts of my experience living in Brooklyn, New York for over four years is in food.  In that time, I was introduced to one of the most delicious beverages ever:  the egg cream.

 

Chocolate and Vanilla Egg Crèmes: Brooklyn’s Best Kept Secret

July, 2012

Go into a diner in Brooklyn and they are hard to miss! They are a Brooklyn tradition since the turn of the 20th century. They were a staple in drug store soda shops. What are they? Brooklyn’s best kept secret: egg crèmes!

What pray tell is an egg crème? A delicious, non-alcoholic soda you can make cheaply and easily in your own home. Dining out and they are not on the menu? Ask for one anyway. Most restaurants with a bar tender have the ingredients right there – they just may need the recipe from you. The Altoona, Pennsylvania Olive Garden recently made them for my dining party after I asked. The rest of my group was skeptical about this Brooklyn invention…that is, until it arrived and we each drank one!

Here’s what you need to make your own egg crème:

12 oz glass

Whole milk (or really indulge with a splash of half and half with your milk)

Seltzer soda water (club soda is more salty, but will work if you cannot find seltzer)

Fox’s U-Bet chocolate or vanilla syrup (Hershey’s can be substituted, but be aware that the Fox’s product is more of a semi-sweet chocolate and Hershey’s is more a milk chocolate that tastes sweeter and less bitter)

  1. Begin by pouring from 1/4th to 2/3rds of your glass with milk and/or milk and half and half.
  2. Add about one to three tablespoons of chocolate or vanilla syrup. The more syrup, the richer and sweeter the taste.
  3. Stir vigorously.
  4. Add seltzer to the top of the glass, tilting the glass to maximize the carbonated head. A thick head of about 2 inches is considered ideal.
  5. Stir vigorously.
  6. Drink immediately.

Some purists I know from Brooklyn say to stir only once and to make the dryer version with only 1/4th of the glass in milk. I personally love the richer, sweeter version created by using at least half a glass of milk and more syrup. You add more calories this way, but it’s a tastier soda.

Egg crèmes can make a great party drink. Simply mix the milk and syrup into a pitcher with a heavily chilled 1 liter or 2 liter bottle on ice on the table. Then ask guests to simply pour their milk/syrup in first and top with the seltzer. Those swizzle stick stirrers are great if you are serving egg crèmes this way. For a fancy touch, chocolate shavings make the perfect garnish. Simply set out a small dessert bowl of the shavings for your guests next to the egg crème ingredients.

Egg crèmes are the perfect balance between chocolate milk and regular sodas, giving you the best of both worlds. They are a delicious treat for your meal, your party, or just the end of a hard day.

So try the Brooklyn egg crème and discover what most Brooklynites have known for decades!

Summer Coffee Experiment: Iced Coffee Without the Coffee Maker

It’s hot — too hot for hot coffee.  This is one of my favorite food posts to Yahoo Voices made on August 6th, 2013.

 

Summer Coffee Experiment: Iced Coffee Without the Coffee Maker

Beating the Heat with a Surprising Alternative to Brewed Coffee

 It’s hot out there! If you are like me, and odds are you are, the idea of drinking hot anything just doesn’t have the same appeal as it does in October. So what is a coffee lover supposed to do?Drink iced of course!But iced coffee still has to be brewed — or does it?

This summer I’ve conducted a special coffee experiment: put away the coffee maker and make iced coffee entirely using INSTANT coffee.

Did I just say INSTANT? Yes. I realize this is heresy in the coffee world, but yes! At least on a trial basis, an experiment designed to see if I can avoid heating my apartment, even for several minutes, by way of the coffee maker.

Being picky about coffee, just ANY instant coffee will not do. For the experiment, I bought a three ounce canister of Folgers classic roast crystals. I also opened up a bottle of my favorite flavored creamer –Baileys lately.

Here’s the approximate recipe I’ve used this summer so far:

one to two ounces Baileys creamer
1 to 1/2 tsp instant Folgers classic roast coffee crystals
eight to ten ounces whole milk.

Put each of these in order in a standard 12 ounce glass. Stir vigorously. If the day is especially hot, add one or two ice cubes.

I usually then let the coffee sit for a couple minutes to give any unmixed coffee the chance to saturate — then drink it. No sugar required (and I love my coffee sweet) unless I choose to omit the creamer that day — which tastes just as good with a little sugar added to compensate.

The end product is essentially an iced cafe au lait or iced coffee Americano at least as good as any iced coffee I’ve bought at Starbucks. Cost: about fifty cents per glass, depending on the brand of creamer you use with the milk.

After drinking my coffee this way for the last seven weeks, I’m sold; I just bought another canister of instant Folgers to cover the rest of the summer.

As picky as I am about coffee and food in general, this passes my test. Try it yourself!