It’s About Time: proper formatting of the Timelines in the Legendary Women of World History series

The Legendary Women of World History series is the best selling narrative biography series written by Laurel A. Rockefeller. With the exception of “Boudicca, Britain’s Queen of the Iceni,” each biography features a detailed timeline designed to help streamline the main narrative by keeping most of the dates out of the story.  The timelines are designed to be as easy to read as possible, offering the maximum of information with a quick scan of the page.

For that reason, the timelines do not use the standard date format.  In the USA, the standard date format is (including all possible variables):

  • Day of the week
  • Month
  • Date
  • Year
  • Time of day.

Listing historical events this way however would be confusing and make it very difficult to locate a specific event.  For that reason, I use the following structure and organization in each timeline:

  • Year usually followed by BCE (Before the Common Era — aka “BC”) or CE (Common Era — aka “AD”)
  • Season (if known) OR
  • Day of the month (if known) AND
  • Month.

Events occurring in the same year are organized from the most general to the most specific in chronological order.  For example:

  • 1619; King Louis XIII and Queen Anne of Austria finally consummate their marriage four years after their wedding.
  • 1619, 10th February; Christine Marie of France marries Victor Amadeus of Savoy.
  • 1619, 22nd February; Marie de Medici escapes Blois and establishes her new court in Angoulême. Charles d’Albert de Luynes begins working with Bishop Richelieu on a diplomatic solution to the Medici problem.
  • 1619, spring-summer; Bishop Richelieu arrives in Angoulême to negotiate with Marie de Medici in person.
  • 1619, 8th July; the marquis of Thémines, captain of Queen Marie de Medici’s guards challenges Seigneur Henri de Richelieu to a duel, killing Richelieu. The family debt from both François and Henri du Plessis passes to Armand Richelieu to discharge and repay.
  • 1619, 10th August; thanks to careful negotiations by Bishop Richelieu, Queen Marie de Medici and King Louis XIII sign the Treaty of Angoulême. Du Luynes assigns Richelieu to de Medici’s court to contain and control her.

As you can see from this example from “His Red Eminence,” the year 1619 was a busy year filled with events we both know happened sometime that year but no more specific than the year, one where we know within a six-month span approximately when in the year it happened, and several where we know the exact date.

Though other countries structure their dates differently than in the United States, it is very important for each translated edition to follow the same structure as I present in the English in order to preserve this organization of events and keep it as readable as possible.

 

 

 

One thought on “It’s About Time: proper formatting of the Timelines in the Legendary Women of World History series

  1. I want to add that in the narrative text itself I often write the dates out. For example, I will write “sixteen twenty-two” instead of 1622 in the text. This is done on purpose: it makes it easier to narrate to audio format and provides a clearer working script.

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