Archive | October 2014

Reblog: History of Halloween

Merry Samhain everyone!  In honor of Samhain and Halloween, I am re-posting a lovely article I found this morning  by Benjamin Radford of Live Science about the history of Halloween.  Enjoy!

 

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Halloween is the season for little ghosts and goblins to take to the streets, asking for candy and scaring one another silly. Spooky stories are told around fires, scary movies appear in theaters and pumpkins are expertly (and not-so-expertly) carved into jack-o’-lanterns.

Amid all the commercialism, haunted houses and bogus warnings about razors in apples, the origins of Halloween are often overlooked. Yet Halloween is much more than just costumes and candy; in fact, the holiday has a rich and interesting history.
Samhain

Halloween, also known as All Hallows’ Eve, can be traced back about 2,000 years to a pre-Christian Celtic festival held around Nov. 1 called Samhain (pronounced “sah-win”), which means “summer’s end” in Gaelic, according to the Indo-European Etymological Dictionaries. [Related: 13 Halloween Superstitions & Traditions Explained]

Because ancient records are sparse and fragmentary, the exact nature of Samhain is not fully understood, but it was an annual communal meeting at the end of the harvest year, a time to gather resources for the winter months and bring animals back from the pastures. Samhain is also thought to have been a time of communing with the dead, according to folklorist John Santino.

“There was a belief that it was a day when spirits of the dead would cross over into the other world,” Santino told Live Science. Such moments of transition in the year have always been thought to be special and supernatural, he added.

Halloween provides a safe way to play with the concept of death, Santino said. People dress up as the living dead, and fake gravestones adorn front lawns — activities that wouldn’t be tolerated at other times of the year, he said.

But according to Nicholas Rogers, a history professor at York University in Toronto and author of “Halloween: From Pagan Ritual to Party Night” (Oxford University Press, 2003), “there is no hard evidence that Samhain was specifically devoted to the dead or to ancestor worship.

“According to the ancient sagas, Samhain was the time when tribal peoples paid tribute to their conquerors and when the sidh [ancient mounds] might reveal the magnificent palaces of the gods of the underworld,” Rogers wrote. Samhain was less about death or evil than about the changing of seasons and preparing for the dormancy (and rebirth) of nature as summer turned to winter, he said.

Though a direct connection between Halloween and Samhain has never been proven, many scholars believe that because All Saints’ Day (or All Hallows’ Mass, celebrated Nov. 1) and Samhain, are so close together on the calendar, they influenced each other and later combined into the celebration now called Halloween.
Costumes and trick-or-treating

The tradition of dressing in costumes and trick-or-treating may go back to the practice of “mumming” and “guising,” in which people would disguise themselves and go door-to-door, asking for food, Santino said. Early costumes were usually disguises, often woven out of straw, he said, and sometimes people wore costumes to perform in plays or skits.

The practice may also be related to the medieval custom of “souling” in Britain and Ireland, when poor people would knock on doors on Hallowmas (Nov. 1), asking for food in exchange for prayers for the dead.

Trick-or-treating didn’t start in the United States until World War II, but American kids were known to go out on Thanksgiving and ask for food — a practice known as Thanksgiving begging, Santino said.

“Mass solicitation rituals are pretty common, and are usually associated with winter holidays,” Santino said. While one tradition didn’t necessarily cause the others, they were “similar and parallel,” he said.
Tricks and games

These days, the “trick” part of the phrase “trick or treat” is mostly an empty threat, but pranks have long been a part of the holiday.

By the late 1800s, the tradition of playing tricks on Halloween was well established. In the United States and Canada, the pranks included tipping over outhouses, opening farmers’ gates and egging houses. But by the 1920s and ’30s, the celebrations more closely resembled an unruly block party, and the acts of vandalism got more serious.

Some people believe that because pranking was starting to get dangerous and out of hand, parents and town leaders began to encourage dressing up and trick-or-treating as a safe alternative to doing pranks, Santino said.

However, Halloween was as much a time for festivities and games as it was for playing tricks or asking for treats. Apples are associated with Halloween, both as a treat and in the game of bobbing for apples, a game that since the colonial era in America was used for fortune-telling. Legend has it that the first person to pluck an apple from the water-filled bucket without using his or her hands would be the first to marry, according to the book “Halloween and Commemorations of the Dead” (Chelsea House, 2009) by Roseanne Montillo.

Apples were also part of another form of marriage prophecy. According to legend, on Halloween (sometimes at the stroke of midnight), young women would peel an apple into one continuous strip and throw it over her shoulder. The apple skin would supposedly land in the shape of the first letter of her future husband’s name.

Another Halloween ritual involved looking in a mirror at midnight by candlelight, for a future husband’s face was said to appear. (A scary variation of this later became the “Bloody Mary” ritual familiar to many schoolgirls.) Like many such childhood games, it was likely done in fun, though at least some people took it seriously.
Christian/Irish influence

Some evangelical Christians have expressed concern that Halloween is somehow satanic because of its roots in pagan ritual. However, ancient Celts did not worship anything resembling the Christian devil and had no concept of it. In fact, the Samhain festival had long since vanished by the time the Catholic Church began persecuting witches in its search for satanic cabals. And, of course, black cats do not need to have any association with witchcraft to be considered evil — simply crossing their path is considered bad luck any time of year.

As for modern Halloween, Santino, writing in “American Folklore: An Encyclopedia” (Garland, 1996), noted that “Halloween beliefs and customs were brought to North America with the earliest Irish immigrants, then by the great waves of Irish immigrants fleeing the famines of the first half of the nineteenth century. Known in the North American continent since colonial days, by the middle of the twentieth century Halloween had become largely a children’s holiday.” Since that time, the holiday’s popularity increased dramatically as adults, communities and institutions (such as schools, campuses and commercial haunted houses) have embraced the event.

Through the ages, various supernatural entities — including fairies and witches — came to be associated with Halloween, and more than a century ago in Ireland, the event was said to be a time when spirits of the dead could return to their old haunting grounds. Dressing up as ghosts or witches became fashionable, though as the holiday became more widespread and more commercialized (and with the arrival of mass-manufactured costumes), the selection of disguises for kids and adults greatly expanded beyond monsters to include everything from superheroes to princesses to politicians.

Staff writer Tanya Lewis contributed to this article.

 

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Reblog: Make Momentum Your Friend

The latest from Abraham Hicks is all about momentum.

Make Momentum Your Friend

Thinking British is the surest way to become British.

Thinking British is the surest way to become British.

“When something really matters a lot, it tends to get really an inordinate amount of your attention.

And when it´s moving into the direction you don´t want it to move, than that inordinate attention increases the momentum.

And the thing that is so confounding about it, to you, that thing that makes you feel that disgust and rage, is – a part of you knows, that it doesn´t have to be that way.

A part of you knows, that you are smarter than this, a part of you knows that if you just could get hold of it and apply yourself in a different way – you could turn it around!

We want you to make MOMENTUM your friend, too!

The thing we so want to convey to you in a way that you can really feel it, is that sliding in opposition to what you want DOES NOT INDICATE BAD CREATION.

It indicates strong determination!

If you really want something, and you are focussed in opposition to it, it´s really really uncomfortable.

If you don´t care at all, then your opposition-thought doesn´t hinder you, at all.

And so, when you feel strong about something, as you do there is very very very good news, in that.

And the good news is:

There is strong, strong, strong, strong, STRONG momentum!

Now we want to help you understand something about momentum!

Because, so far in this conversation, it felt like we´r talking about momentum, that´s taking you into the OPPOSITE direction of where you want to be!

But momentum -ahhhh- momentum is NEVER EVER taking you into the opposite direction of where you want to be!

HEAR THIS!

Momentum is ALWAYS source energy, moving TOWARDS something you really really want!

But in opposite vibration, in opposing personal thought-vibration, the momentum that is really leading TOWARDS where you want to go, feels AWFUL while you are pulling against it!

Now, did you get that??

THIS MOMENTUM -this is not a downward-slide, that you are upon, this is an onward slide, this is the Universe, lining everything up, to give you everything that you want!

THAT´S WHAT´S REALLY HAPPENING!

But where you are standing within it, and almost everybody would understand it – you are pulling in such opposition that it FEELS to you, that the momentum is going in the opposite direction – because you´r taking score of current manifestations instead of understanding the power of the momentum!

It would be a little bit like, if you would be garnering the empathise, that you where going to shoot something far far far out into space- but so far, the rocket hasn´t been launched.

So, it´s just sitting there- in a resistant state!

In other words, it wants to go, but they got it all strapped down, and so it looks like it´s going to tear the whole launchpad up, if somebody won´t cut it loose and let it GO- and THAT´s what we want you to focus on, here!

This momentum, that feels like downward-spiral, is NOT a downward-spiral.

It´s an upward-spiral, that you are not flowing with, yet.

That´s all that it is.”

Abraham Hicks

Repost: 5 Simple Ways to Say No

Women/ValidationA few days ago I received this fantastic article in my email about how to say “no” to people.  As women, most of us are trained to NOT say “no” no matter how badly we need to say it.  We are told we are selfish, arrogant, and so forth.  But “no” is the most important word any woman can say.

 

Here is Dharma Rose’s Advice on the matter:

“Do you find it hard to say “no”?

If so, you’re not alone.

Many people find themselves saying “yes” to things they don’t really want to agree to out of fear they’ll appear selfish or rude… or in an effort to avoid conflict or hurting another person’s feelings.

Saying “no” isn’t always easy, but it IS vital to your own self care.

You see, healthy people have healthy boundaries, and part of being healthy is occasionally saying no to requests, situations or people that you can’t or don’t want to accommodate.

Here are 5 simple ways that you can say no with ease, power and grace:

Tactic #1: The Full Plate

If you’re way too busy to accommodate the person’s request, let them know you’re slammed and that you simply have no time to fit what they’re asking you to do into your schedule.

“I’m sorry, I’d love to help you, but my schedule is crazy today/this week/this month and there’s no way I can fit this in.”

Tactic #2: The Think-About-It

If you’re not sure if you can fit the person’s request in, or if you’re dealing with someone who is super pushy, consider buying yourself a little time to think about what they’re asking of you and to get back to them on your own terms.

“Let me think about it and I’ll get back to you.”

Tactic #3: The Boomerang

Are you super busy? Or in the middle of something else? You can ask the person to come back to you later on when you have more time to listen to and consider their request.

“I’m in the middle of juggling a few things right now. Can you please ask me again in a couple of hours/days/weeks? I’ll have a bit more headspace then to consider what you’re asking.”

Tactic #4: The Counter Offer

If you can’t or don’t want to agree to the person’s request for whatever reason, but you’d still really like to help them out, consider making a counter offer for a lesser commitment that works better for you.

“I’m sorry, I can’t help you move on Saturday. But I CAN come by for a few hours to help you pack on Friday evening. Does that work?”

Tactic #5: The Firm No

The simplest way to say no is to simply… say no! You can be direct and let the person know that what they’re asking of you just doesn’t work for you, and you’ll be surprised how often people will respect a firm, direct no.

“No, I’m sorry, I can’t.”

As you practice declining requests that don’t align with your schedule, values or needs, you’ll find that saying no becomes easier and easier…

And that you’ll have more time for yourself, the commitments you already have and the things that are most important to you.

Rock your day!

Dharma Rose
Abundant Entrepreneur

Repost: Find Something to Be Happy About

Another great Law of Attraction affirmation from Abraham Hicks:

 

923544_522633857793764_2029061548_n“Find something to be happy about.

With each moment of bliss, more of that which you’ve identified as your desire flows to you, until another moment of bliss comes and another, and another, and it seems as if the entire Universe revolves around you.

And it does.

So, a very short seminar would serve you, if you could hear it. And it would go something like this: Find something to be happy about. Goodbye! “

Abraham Hicks

Repost: Why Networking Is a Dirty Word

Another very useful blog post from Stage 32.  Today’s is called Why Networking Is a Dirty Word.

 

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Today’s blog marks the return of one of my favorite people on the planet, Julie Gray.

The author of Just Effing Entertain Me: A Screenwriter’s Atlas, Julie Gray is a script consultant and writer living in Tel Aviv, Israel. A Huffington Post and Script Magazine contributor, Julie is a favorite speaker at the London Screenwriter’s Festival and has taught story at Warner Bros. Entertainment, Oxford University and The San Francisco de Quito University in Quito, Ecuador. Julie directs the Tel Aviv Writer’s Salon, consults with prose and screenwriters all over the world and volunteers with Amnesty International in Israel, helping African refugees to tell their stories, as well as with Natal, a non-profit for survivors of terror and war.

Can you see why Julie is one of my favorite people on the planet?  But wait, there’s more.

Julie has selflessly helped hundreds of screenwriters and other film creatives througout her career both personally and through her recently retired website, Just Effing Entertain Me.  She recently launched her new site, Stories Without Borders (how perfect is that name?), where her passion for screenwriting and those who choose to pursue a life in the craft shine through.

Compassionate, brave and selfless, they don’t come much better than Julie.

And she knows a thing or two about networking too.  The evidence lies below.

Enjoy!

RB

“It’s who you know”. We’ve all heard it.  It is perhaps one of the top three truisms about Hollywood, the other two being, ironically, “Know the rules before you break them” and “There are no rules”.

Networking. The word is both specific and vague. Like – go to cocktail parties with other writers? Invite people to lunch? Go to screenwriting events? Hand out business cards? What kind of business cards? What should I wear? Oh did you hear SO-AND-SO will be there? MAYBE HE/SHE WILL READ MY SCRIPT!

Oy. This is a pernicious and slippery slope. We’ve all done it, the nerves, the desperate feeling… It doesn’t even feel good to think about, right?

Let’s forget that kind of networking. Let’s call it something else.

Let’s call it Relationship Building.

Relationships have two basic building blocks: shared interests and reciprocity. Relationships are the framework within which we share valuable resources, services and information. Relationships are reciprocal – we benefit mutually.

Think of your day-to-day life. You need a lift somewhere, or a cup of sugar, or the name of a good dentist. Who do you call? No – not Ghostbusters, smarty pants – you call friends or family members and ask for help. People with whom you have a relationship. Who do they call when they need help baking a pie or changing their oil or choosing a good vet? You.

“It takes a village” is not a cliché; it is fundamentally important to our well-being and happiness as humans. Not to go all Jared Diamond on you, but man evolved away from being solitary from hunter/gatherers, subject to every whim of nature when
we settled down into a cooperative lifestyle in which we exchanged goods and services.  For thousands of years, humans have lived in a shared economy, an eco-system, if you will, of resources, services and information. It’s how we not only survived but how we flourished. We need each other.

As writers, this is especially true. Writing can be a very isolating occupation, filled with long hours and frustrations. Both the world of Hollywood and traditional publishing can seem like exclusive clubs to which you do not belong. So you wait, standing in line in the rain. How do you get in?

“It’s who you know” does not mean simply that you have met a person who might be advantageous to you, therefore you “know” them and they now help you. That isn’t how it works. That is not relationship building, that is just rude.

Let’s take it back to what we know – in our normal lives:  When a friend or acquaintance – someone who’s company you have enjoyed even just a little bit, asks a favor of you, generally, if you can, you do it gladly, right? I do. If it’s someone else – well, we’re all busy, right?

You scratch my back, I’ll scratch yours. Another truism. Truisms are called truisms for a reason. If I help you bake that pie, that’s money in the bank for me in two ways: 1) It gives me pleasure to help someone I like and 2) I know that when I need help, I can ask you. And I know for sure I will need help at some point – we all do.

It’s how we humans are wired – for cooperation and reciprocity. Relationship building is mutually beneficial.

So forget networking. A pox on it!

Build relationships with other writers.

Go to events
Bring a business card
Talk with people – actually talk with them
See if there is a favor you can do for someone else
Get to know people who are on your same level or above
Consider mentoring a writer who is starting out (don’t forget another truism of Hollywood: Today’s assistant is tomorrow’s executive).

Apply the same relationship building skills with other writers that you do in your home and your office. Reciprocity, cooperation, sharing of resources.

Relationship building is like dating: you have to kiss some frogs and there will be missed opportunities. That’s okay. There will be other chances.

Sometimes, despite your best efforts, things like this will happen:

You will stumble upon people who only take. Dump them.
You will stumble upon people who do not share your interests or trajectory at all.
You will stumble upon people who are simply not interested in you. That’s okay.
You will stumble upon a GREAT connection – at the wrong moment. Let it go.

Recently, a client of mine wrote a great one-hour drama pilot. I mean – really great. So I hooked him up to have lunch with an HBO/Showtime producer, an NBC/Universal fellow, and a writer on Netflix’s From Dusk Til Dawn. These are all my friends and they are happy to meet this new writer. Because I wrote that letter of recommendation to NBC/Universal. Because I have sent many good scripts to the producer. Because I helped get that writing gig. And my friends have helped me, too, in many ways. All I ask when I connect people to my connections is that they join that circle of giving themselves.  Circle of giving – not circle of taking. Nobody wants to belong to a group of people like that.

When our very own beloved Richard Botto asked me to write an article about relationship building for Stage 32, I did not hesitate for a split second. Because I believe in what Richard does – community building. And because Richard is my friend. He was there for me during a very tough time in my life – you don’t forget those kinds of things.

You’ll find that most people are actually very generous with their time, their resources and their connections – people love helping other people. It’s scientifically proven.

In the world of writing, especially writing for entertainment, which is so collaborative, relationships areeverything.  It’s how you hear about those opportunities before anybody else has heard of them, it’s how you get that recommendation or those great notes. It is how you get introduced to people who are interested in your work.

But relationships don’t happen overnight and they will not blossom at all if you are not patient, sincere and generous yourself.

Here are some common sense guidelines:

1. Meet liked minded people; go to events, participate online, get out there.
2. Primarily think about what YOU have to offer someone else (and no, it’s not your script)
3. Give relationships time to build. Check in. Grab a coffee. Have no agenda.
4. Wash, rinse, repeat.

Don’t network – a pox on networking! Build relationships!

Reblog: The Reality of an Unreal Career — part two

On 6th October, I reblogged a fascinating article, “The Reality of an Unreal Career — part one.”  Yesterday part two posted.  Here is that post in full:

 

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Today we continue with Part 2 of The Reality of an Unreal Career from Stage 32 member Beau Janzen.

Part 1 brought us stories of animated vegetables and an 8-ft tall phallus shaped green screen monster.

Today, we’ll learn how a gopher can become a dinosaur.  Ah, the movie business.

However, though Beau has made a career as a visual effects artist and animator, his advice certainly translates across all disciplines.  For example:  “You can’t drive yourself forward in the industry with the fuel of your own ego reveling in the cool projects you’re working on.”

Yep, this is highly recommended reading for all.

Enjoy!

RB

One lesson I learned very early on:

You can’t drive yourself forward in the industry with the fuel of your own ego reveling in the cool projects you’re working on. 

Many projects you take on may seem silly or downright horrible, but they still demand your disciplined work.  I come in to the studio and squeeze my brain over a shot not for the prestige of the project, but for the pride of making great imagery.

Over the years, my technical skills broadened and I learned the nuances of how to sail through the maelstroms of production.  One lesson I learned which saved me repeatedly was:

You can never over-prepare

For one film, I served on-set as visual effects supervisor for the finale sequence that required a host of complex effects.  The visual effects director for the show was an amazing treasure trove of experience, and between the two of us, we were able to glean every possible measurement and reference from the set that we could.  For the next five months, I built up the sequence into something I was pretty proud of.  I was able to add in all sorts of details that the audience doesn’t see but “feels” to help sell the shot.  Just before I added in some finishing touches, we sent a near-completed version of the sequence to editorial so they could cut together a test version of the film.  After the initial audience test screening, we had a phone call which went something like this:

The Studio: “We’re really happy with the look of the sequence, but we have some bad news.  We changed the edit of the film around a bit, so now the ending doesn’t make any sense.  The audience was very confused.”
Us: “Yeah, we understand.”
The Studio: “So, that means we’re cutting that ending.  And, we’re going to need a new one.”
Us: “Oh… So what’s the new ending?”
The Studio: “We don’t exactly know. But it has to look really cool.  And we go to final print of the film in two weeks.”

I’d like to say that I was able to come in like Harvey Keitel in Pulp Fiction to clean up the crisis with confident, unwavering authority, but in the trenches of VFX work, we’re pretty much devoid of all glamour. However, due to the exhaustive over-planning I had done on set, years of MacGyver art experience, and a rugged coffee machine, I was able to design and crank out a new ending.  The original ending was at least able to live on as a DVD “bonus extra”.

In my career, I’ve stayed in small to medium-sized studios.   At the large studios, the skill sets of the artists are more focused. They hire an army of people who are specialists in one facet of production like digital modeling or animation who do just that one skill.  Smaller studios need staff that can adapt to changing needs and hire “generalists” such as me who are able to take on whatever comes their way.  While this has probably kept many A-list films off my resume, I enjoy the challenge of working across the spectrum of digital production and doing very different work from one month to the next.

The visual effects industry is definitely unique in entertainment not only from a creative and technical perspective, but in terms of the business model as well. Beyond that, I think it’s often misunderstood by people on the outside.  We seem to need green in order to insert magical things, and any behind the scenes footage shows fat computers and strange people jumping around in body stockings covered in ping pong balls.  I’ll shed some light on a few facets of our industry that might be surprising:

In a pinch, we recycle as much work as we can

This conversation has happened more times than I can remember:

The Studio: “Can you all help us out?! We have some shots that need to be created now, and we’re running out of time!”
Us: “I’m sorry, but we’re booked up with other shows.  We can’t devote any resources to this job.”
The Studio: “Here’s a big bag full of money!”
Us: “Why, certainly we can do it!”

The problem is that we’d still have no people or machines we could afford to put on the show.  We’d then resort to recycling.  They need a rampaging dinosaur? How about we take that gopher we made last month, stretch out the legs and take off the hair.  With the right lighting and fast motion, you have a dinosaur.  It doesn’t have to go on our demo reel, and the check from the studio will still clear.

I rarely criticize horrible VFX shots I see

I will absolutely call out shots in films and television that look terrible, but at the same time, I don’t know the circumstances of the production.  I’ve had too many crunched deadlines, last minute changes, and factors beyond my control that have resulted in my shots looking less than ideal, that I don’t presume the artists were incompetent. I just think to myself,  “that there but for the grace of god go I.”

We do hide stuff in our shots

No, we don’t hide lewd sex images, but if a shot needs to have a digital car added, why not make the license plate your child’s initials and birthday? Personal tags and inside jokes are everywhere.  One colleague once added himself in as a bloody murder victim in a film which was more than I’d really want to do.

You can’t wear Wolverine claws while operating a mouse

For the X-Men films, we received the metal claws Wolverine sports in the films as reference (you can never have too much reference). Sadly, you can’t wear them while effectively operating a mouse.

Since my initial departure from education when I went into the film industry, I have been able to take a few detours back.  When I can afford the time, I continue to work on my own educational short films and continue to enter them in festivals.  For the most part, they have been very successful, although the film which I am the most proud of did lose out at one festival to an amateur video on preventing gum disease.  I also took a year-long job at a university in Berlin, Germany as a guest researcher with the Sonderforschungsbereich.  I eagerly accepted the job, even before I had any idea what Sonderforschungsbereich was.  I was pleased to find out that it didn’t consist of cleaning toilets, but did involve creating a math video on research topics in discrete geometry.  Later, when my kids were young, I took a job teaching math and visual effects which allowed me to be away from my family for only three days a week.

Reason for Math : Gauss’s Addition from Beau Janzen on Vimeo.
All in all, I’d have to say that I feel successful with where I am in my career.  First and foremost, I’ve been able to pay the bills while pursuing a creative endeavor which I know in many ways is a privilege. I’ve had the opportunity to work on some great films with some great people, which has in turn given me more opportunities.  I do love the act of constructing imagery and still get a buzz of adrenalin when I’m able to make a technical challenge fall into place and create something beautiful.  While I haven’t yet been able to redirect my work entirely back into education, it’s still something I’m pursuing.

In hindsight, I think orchestrating a career is similar to orchestrating a shot.  There are a host of technical limitations and challenges that can prevent you from reaching your goal. But in the end, that’s what creativity is all about.  Creativity isn’t some loose mental activity that takes place in an unobstructed vacuum; it’s about defining your own unique goal and dexterously making it work in the face of the impossible.


If you missed Part 1 of The Reality of an Unreal Career, click here.

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Followup News: Booklinker REVERSES advertising policy

Blogging makes a difference!  After reporting on 4th October 2014 regarding Booklinker’s new plan to charge authors a monthly fee to use their links without intrusive advertisements before customers can reach Amazon.com, Booklinker has JUST REVERSED their decision,

“Laurel A. Rockefeller,

This is just a quick email to let you know that we at BookLinker have reversed our decision to use advertising as a means to fund our service.

This means that all BookLinker links are now completely back to the way they were a few days ago – i.e. no advertising whatsoever.

After having reviewed the situation, we are now uninanmously committed to an ad-free BookLinker forever.

Many thanks to those of you who provided us with feedback, and we have already refunded everyone who had already signed up for the premium plan.

It was at least encouraging to realise just how much our service is appreciated!”

 

Will this change my marketing strategy?  Probably not; I already deleted every viewbook.at link address from my files.  But this does represent a clear victory for the power of  our voices.  Change DOES HAPPEN when we band together and say “no” to something.

 

Let us continue to use our voices together to make the market place more fair to everyone, removing all thoughts of competition from our mind and replacing these with a sense of community.  Together we all sell more books.  Together we all make a difference to our world.