Beinarian Astronomy: Names, Objects, and Locations Explained

M31 galaxy is known as D395 on planet Beinan

M31 galaxy is known as D395 on planet Beinan

Reposted from “The Great Succession Crisis Extended Edition”

Just as with modern Earth astronomy, stars, galaxies, and planets are named systematically.  For example, D425E25 Tertius, LK39, and B105K7.  This names are not random, but consist of specific elements used to specify an astronomical object’s exact location.  Here is exactly how a Beinarian object is named

Region of space:  the first letter in an object’s name indicates the region of space where it is located.  This name runs from single letters to double letters.  A single letter indicates the object is located 5 million light yen-ars away (15 million light Earth years) or closer, while a double letter is used for objects calculated as more distance than 5 million light yen-ars.  Objects in the A region are located in Beinan’s original lenticular galaxy.  Objects in B region are located in Beinan’s own galaxy.  C represents the remaining galaxies in Beinan’s local galactic group while D represents galaxies in the adjacent local group as observed through interstellar travel. 

Since Beinarian astronomers observe the universe as “cauliflower shaped,” it is understood that the number and location of objects in any given region of space will be highly variable.

 

Galaxy designation:  the numbers following the first letter(s) in the location name signify the specific galaxy within that region an object belongs. The galaxy designation number may consist of any number of digits, though seven is the greatest number observed for any specific region of space. Examples: LK39 is an elliptical galaxy 12 million light yen-ars on the edge of the known universe first observed during the Great Migration.  D425 is a medium sized spiral galaxy located only 846,000 light yen-ars from slightly larger D395 galaxy. 

On D425E25 Tertius, D395 is known as the “M31” galaxy.

 

Star system name:  star systems are assigned an alphanumeric name based on their exact location within their galaxy.  Depending on the galaxy and type of galaxy, star systems may have up to three letters and from two to six numbers in their names.  For example, E25, and DLG4821

Object name:  Objects (primarily planets and moons) are named by their position in their star system.  Planets are named numerically (Primus, Secundus, Tertius, Quartus, Quintus, Sextus, Septimus, Octivus, Nonus, Decimus, etc.).  Moons are designated first by their planet location, then numbered, started with the closest moon to the planet.  For example, D425E25 Quintus has sixteen moons large enough to be classified as moons (dwarf objects such as asteroids are not named).  The nearest of these moons is therefore named D425E25 Quintus Primus whereas the most distant of these moons is named D425E25 Quintus Sextus-Decimus.

 

Dwarf objects, asteroid fields, rings, and other features are designated by the object they rotate around.  For example, the asteroid field between D425E25 Tertius and D425E25 Quartus is named simply D425E25 Luanxing (pebble of the star) whereas the ring system around D425E25 Sextus is called D425E25 Sextus daixing (ribbon of the stars).

 

Bibliography:

 

Latin Numerals:  Numerals with English Equivalents,” http://wordinfo.info/unit/2356/ip:2/il:L

 

“The Andromeda Galaxy,” http://www.noao.edu/image_gallery/html/im0424.html

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